Seville's La Giralda by day in Spain

Seville – A VERY Passionate City

Friends in London convinced me I had to go to Seville. I’m very pleased I did. Sitting on the Guadalquivir River, Seville feels like an authentic Spanish city of old. It’s the heart of Andalusian culture, and the home of Flamenco, bullfighting, and arguably the region’s best tapas bars. Which surely makes it one of the world’s most passionate cities.

Seville Spain Rooftop City Sign

Seville Spain's main streets

Seville Spain Heritage building




Seville’s art and architecture (Roman, Islamic, Gothic, Renaissance, baroque) is also without equal in southern Spain. So start your visit in the old city, taking in the cathedral, La Giralda Tower (which are every bit as stunning during the day or lit up at night) and the Real Alcazar palace without even leaving the square.

La Giralda is the cathedral’s beautiful minaret tower, originally intended for the chief mosque, but now the magnificent bell tower of the Cathedral and a symbol of Seville. You can climb to the top for a great view of the city.

The Cathedral of Seville, is a fifteenth century cathedral that occupies the site of the former great mosque built in the late twelfth century and is the final resting place of Christopher Columbus.

The Real Alcázar is a stunning palace in Mudéjar (Moorish) style, built in the XIV Century by Pedro I the Cruel and now listed as a world heritage site. Its extravagant architecture, lavish gardens, ponds and extensive courtyards, it’s a fascinating place. Look out for the room where Christopher Columbus’s journey to the Americas were planned.

Seville's La Giralda by day in Spain

Seville Spain streets by night

Ancient Seville Palace Spain

Seville Spain grand hotel

This ancient architecture is then surprisingly and beautifully offset with the modern Metropol Parasol:

Seville Spain Metropol Parasol

Once you’ve taken in these architectural gems, spend your time taking in three of Seville’s biggest passions: Bullfighting, Flamenco and of course Tapas.

Seville Spain Flamenco door handle

Seville Spain Bulls poster

Seville Spain Tapas Bar

Slow Day Grand Canal Venice

Palazzo Barbarigo – Luxury on Venice’s Grand Canal

If you can afford the overpriced fare of a water taxi to the Palazzo Barbarigo hotel in Venice, you’ll want to take it. It’s a very romantic way to arrive at the front door of your hotel. The reward is a quality art deco boutique hotel on the Grand Canal.

Front door hotel on water in Venice

It is relatively small double-story hotel. Plush and luxurious, its art deco décor evokes the best of a bygone era, and as Conde Nast Traveller said it is ‘an alternative to the usual grand dame hotel’.



It is a great hotel for couples looking for a romantic place to stay in Venice. The 18 rooms and junior suites are large and very comfortable with four poster beds, flat screen TV, chaise lounge, rain showers and mood lighting. Although there are no balconies, the windows are big and they open out wide so you never feel claustrophobic.

Luxury Hotel Bedroom Venice

The reception and front door that opens directly onto the canal are downstairs with a couple of rooms, whilst the bar, breakfast room and lounge are upstairs with the rest of the rooms leading off the lounge. (You would think this might make the rooms noisy, but ours wasn’t at all). Aside from a couple of rooms at the front, most rooms face onto a quieter side canal that still gets a fair share of traffic, and you can see the grand canal if you look out.

Luxury Lounge Hotel Venice

The hotel doesn’t have a full restaurant, so we stepped out to a recommended local eatery, Trattoria Da Ignazio, for a quick dinner.

A real old school place, with lopsided, low ceilings and cheerful yellow walls. The service and the homely, traditional Italian food was superb. We went with our waiter’s recommendations and every one was delicious. The only other waiter looked at least 100 years old and he we were fascinated all night as he shuffled about serving his tables without skipping a beat.

Restaurant in side street Venice

Back at the hotel we had a nightcap at the bar, which makes you feel like you’re in a 1940’s movie set, with a tiny terrace overlooking the canal, that’s almost deserted later at night. Looking out, it reminded me of those typical western towns in movies, but in this case with a watery main street.

Luxurious bar in boutique hotel Venice

We slept deeply, thanks to the double-glazing on the windows and when I opened them to look out, traffic was in full flow. Three gondolas went by below packed with tourists followed by a rubbish barge and police patrol.

Breakfast was the best I’ve had just about anywhere. There’s no generic buffet or stodgy, stale food here. A mountain of fruit, pastries, cheese and meat is served individually to your table, along with coffee or tea and a list for you to order additional items, most at no extra cost. You would have to be ravenous to finish all that food.

Hotel Grand canal views Venice

The hotel doesn’t have any facilities like a spa, gym or garden, but it is perfectly situated to explore Venice, either by vaporetto or on foot through the alleyways that take you to the famous Rialto Bridge, which offers great views over the Grand Canal.

We spent the day wandering, and getting ridiculously lost, as we tried to criss-cross a couple of districts. Along the way we took in famous sights like St Mark’s Square, partially under water because of the high tide, and the Rialto Market, where locals were shopping for their daily fresh fish and vegetables. A few hours later, having come full circle, we gave our weary legs a break with a long lunch on the Grand Canal. Surprisingly, the area where we sat had been knee deep in water a couple of hours earlier. We filled up happily on pizza and wine, and enjoyed the busy waterway before returning to the comfort of our room for a well deserved afternoon nap.

Slow Day Grand Canal Venice

Gondola Venice side Canal

We were pretty tired the second night, so we spent the evening relaxing in the hotel lounge, researching the next part of our trip. It was comfortable and quiet, and we felt like we were in our own living room. We only saw the other guests as they filtered back to their rooms after their evening out. The barman was very attentive, but never intrusive and we were grateful for the complimentary snacks.

When we left the following morning (after another incredible breakfast), we hopped on the vaporetto (water bus), for a last tour of Venice and climbed off at the train station. With the cold wind and the rain setting in, we had thoughts about heading back to the comfort and warmth of our hotel, but our train was waiting.

Oktoberfest View Munich

The Oktoberfest

Day One

I arrived at the Munich train station excited, but weary about the Oktoberfest. The station was packed with people dressed in traditional clothes and eager to party, and it was already very festive early in the morning. So I got into the spirit fast and I have to say, after two full-on days of craziness at the festival, I’m pleased to report that with a bit of planning, there’s nothing to worry about.

Oktoberfest View Munich

The Oktoberfest village itself isn’t very big. It has 14 tents (including a wine tent) all side by side on either side of a pedestrian road, within stumbling distance of one another and surrounded by about 20 smaller food tents. Strangely, most of the grounds are actually taken up by a funfair with themed rides, including wait for it, a roller coaster. Who’s bright idea was that?



Oktoberfest tent Munich

Beer tent Oktoberfest Berlin

Funfair Oktoberfest Munich

Pretzel stand Oktoberfest Munich

Although I was surprised, it does make for a great atmosphere, ‘cause the place is filled with families any time of the day, bobbing and weaving to avoid legless revelers. Stay out amongst the rides, the lights, the smell of food and the kids, and you could almost forget there were thousands of people in tents nearby, singing Bavarian folk songs and drowning in beer.

Fortunately I was invited to stay with friends which was a relief because hotels are full during Oktoberfest and prices double. Fortunately the same friends, had already booked a table in the Hippodrom tent, a favourite with locals. So I dropped my bags and headed straight into the tent in time for lunch, where the party was in full swing. That was a good thing because in the Hippodrom, you only get the table for three hours. Having booked months in advance, our allotted time was 12 – 3pm. I joined a table with eight other people and giant pretzels, tankards of beer and platters of local Bavarian meat and cheese dishes rained down on me. The band played on the elevated stage above us and by the time all the tables were re-set for the next crowd I was in a happy beer haze.

Hippodrom Tent Dubai

Hippodrom Inside Oktoberfest Munich

Crowds at Oktoberfest Munich

Many of the people on the table headed home to their kids and carry on their normal lives which was a surprise, but that’s when I realised that the Oktobefest is just as much fun for the locals. They are just smarter about what they do there. They look forward to the week and usually pop in to their favourite tent just for an hour or two every day, like they’re going down to their local (very large) pub.

Yes, there are loads of people falling over, vomiting and and passing out but it’s mostly on the grass bank out of sight behind the tents, so you can steer well clear of all that.

Day Two

My second day couldn’t have been any more different to the first. I had been eased into it with the fancier, smaller Hippodrom and the wine tent, but day two we headed straight to the Hofbrauhaus. It’s in the middle of all the action and it’s packed with thousands and thousands of crazy drinkers. I made the mistake of coming in the back way, past the infamous grass bank and through the outdoor beer garden at Hofbrauhaus. Making my way to the front I was given a couple of kidney blows by the waitresses who carry armfuls of heavy beer tankards and swing wildly to move people out the way. If I had fallen in front of one of them, they would’ve stomped on my head, just for better traction.

Crowds at Oktoberfest Munich

Beer Hall Oktoberfest Munich

Smaller tent Oktoberfest Munich

So I was thankful when my friends ushered me in through a side door into a VIP section where we had a table for 20, and then it started again: Pretzels, beer (and a couple of one litre tankards of wine and soda), food platters and another live band. After each tankard we would venture past the huge kitchen where hundreds of chickens were turning in ovens, and into the seething mass to dance on the tables. When we’d had enough we would, thankfully, stroll back past the bouncer back to our table.

Beautiful Beer Hall Oktoberfest Munich

Wine bar Oktoberfest Munich

Crepes stand Oktoberfest

So is it as crazy as everyone says? Yes. Is it really that much fun? Yes. Can you actually leave with your dignity intact? Yes, but only if you want to, and if you do, then follow some of these tips:

Make friends with a local.

Go in the week when it’s not unbearably packed.

Pick one of the fancier tents and try to get a table.

Eat more than you drink.

Don’t go for more than 2 or 3 days.